custom-speeches.com Business Paradise Lost Plain English Pdf

PARADISE LOST PLAIN ENGLISH PDF

Monday, January 13, 2020


A free, 'modern' english translation and summary of John Milton's Paradise Lost. BOOK I ~. Of Mans First Disobedience, and the Fruit; Of that Forbidden Tree, whose mortal tast; Brought Death into the World, and all our woe,; With loss of Eden. Technically, Paradise Lost is in modern English already, since it was written in From which site can the PDF of Paradise Lost in plain English be downloaded?.


Author:CARRY PRACHT
Language:English, Spanish, Arabic
Country:Czech Republic
Genre:Biography
Pages:338
Published (Last):28.12.2015
ISBN:845-1-64787-704-8
ePub File Size:22.45 MB
PDF File Size:8.18 MB
Distribution:Free* [*Regsitration Required]
Downloads:45380
Uploaded by: ARGENTINA

In the Proem to Book 9 of Paradise Lost, Milton states that he had thought English, in the vein of Homer and Spenser, about “Kings and to Milton and that modern spelling and punctuation make the poem more imme-. John Milton put a twist on the story of Adam and Eve—in the process he created what some have called one of the greatest literary works in the English. John Milton's overwhelming masterpiece, Paradise Lost -- all 10, brain- busting lines of it, transformed into simple, everyday language, the kind you and I .

Thirst for revenge led him to cause man's downfall by turning into a serpent and tempting Eve to eat the forbidden fruit. They build a palace, called Pandemonium, where they hold council to determine whether or not to return to battle. Instead they decide to explore a new world prophecied to be created, where a safer course of revenge can be planned.

Satan undertakes the mission alone.

Paradise Lost in Modern English

At the gate of hell, he meets his offspring, Sin and Death, who unbar the gates for him. He journeys across chaos till he sees the new universe floating near the larger globe which is heaven. God sees Satan flying towards this world and foretells the fall of man. His Son, who sits at his right hand, offers to sacrifice himself for man's salvation.

Meanwhile, Satan enters the new universe. He flies to the sun, where he tricks an angel, Uriel, into showing him the way to man's home.

Satan gains entrance into the Garden of Eden, where he finds Adam and Eve and becomes jealous of them. While God gave Adam and Eve total freedom and power to rule over all creation, he gave them one explicit command: not to eat from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil on penalty of death. The story of Adam and Eve's temptation and fall is a fundamentally different, new kind of epic: a domestic one.

Adam and Eve are presented as having a romantic and sexual relationship while still being without sin. They have passions and distinct personalities. Satan, disguised in the form of a serpent, successfully tempts Eve to eat from the Tree by preying on her vanity and tricking her with rhetoric. Adam, learning that Eve has sinned, knowingly commits the same sin.

He declares to Eve that since she was made from his flesh, they are bound to one another — if she dies, he must also die. In this manner, Milton portrays Adam as a heroic figure, but also as a greater sinner than Eve, as he is aware that what he is doing is wrong.

Reward Yourself

After eating the fruit, Adam and Eve have lustful sex. At first, Adam is convinced that Eve was right in thinking that eating the fruit would be beneficial. However, they soon fall asleep and have terrible nightmares, and after they awake, they experience guilt and shame for the first time. Realizing that they have committed a terrible act against God, they engage in mutual recrimination.

Meanwhile, Satan returns triumphantly to Hell, amid the praise of his fellow fallen angels. He tells them about how their scheme worked and Mankind has fallen, giving them complete dominion over Paradise. As he finishes his speech, however, the fallen angels around him become hideous snakes, and soon enough, Satan himself turns into a snake, deprived of limbs and unable to talk.

Thus, they share the same punishment, as they shared the same guilt. Eve appeals to Adam for reconciliation of their actions. Her encouragement enables them to approach God, and sue for grace, bowing on supplicant knee, to receive forgiveness. In a vision shown to him by the angel Michael , Adam witnesses everything that will happen to Mankind until the Great Flood.

Adam is very upset by this vision of the future, so Michael also tells him about Mankind's potential redemption from original sin through Jesus Christ whom Michael calls "King Messiah".

Adam and Eve are cast out of Eden, and Michael says that Adam may find "a paradise within thee, happier far. Satan[ edit ] Satan , formerly called Lucifer , is the first major character introduced in the poem. He was once the most beautiful of all angels, and is a tragic figure who famously declares: "Better to reign in Hell than serve in Heaven. Satan's desire to rebel against his creator stems from his unwillingness to be subjugated by God and his Son, claiming that angels are "self-begot, self-raised," [13] and thereby denying God's authority over them as their creator.

Satan is deeply arrogant, albeit powerful and charismatic. He argues that God rules as a tyrant and that all the angels ought to rule as gods. According to William McCollom, one quality of the classical tragic hero is that he is not perfectly good and that his defeat is caused by a tragic flaw, as Satan causes both the downfall of man and the eternal damnation of his fellow fallen angels despite his dedication to his comrades.

In addition, Satan's Hellenic qualities, such as his immense courage and, perhaps, lack of completely defined morals compound his tragic nature. Milton characterizes him as such, but Satan lacks several key traits that would otherwise make him the definitive protagonist in the work. One deciding factor that insinuates his role as the protagonist in the story is that most often a protagonist is heavily characterized and far better described than the other characters, and the way the character is written is meant to make him seem more interesting or special to the reader.

Satan's existence in the story involves his rebellion against God and his determination to corrupt the beings he creates in order to perpetuate evil so that there can be a discernable balance and justice for both himself and his fallen angels. Therefore, it is more probable that he exists in order to combat God, making his status as the definitive protagonist of the work relative to each book. Following this logic, Satan may very well be considered as an antagonist in the poem, whereas God could be considered as the protagonist instead.

Satan's status as a traditional hero in the work is similarly up to debate as the term "hero" evokes different meanings depending on the time and the person giving the definition and is thus a matter of contention within the text. According to Aristotle, a hero is someone who is "superhuman, godlike, and divine" but is also human. While Milton gives reason to believe that Satan is superhuman, as he was originally an angel, he is anything but human.

Therefore, according to Aristotle's definition of a hero alone, Satan is not a hero.

Paradise Lost In Plain and Simple English (A Modern Translation and the Original Version)

Torquato Tasso and Francesco Piccolomini expanded on Aristotle's definition and declared that for someone to be considered heroic one has to be perfectly or overly virtuous.

Satan goes against God's law and therefore becomes corrupt and lacking of virtue and, as Piccolomini warned, "vice may be mistaken for heroic virtue. Satan achieves this end multiple times throughout the text as he riles up his band of fallen angels during his speech by deliberately telling them to do evil to explain God's hypocrisy and again during his entreaty to Eve. Let us not slip th' occasion, whether scorn, Or satiate fury yield it from our Foe.

Navigation menu

Seest thou yon dreary Plain, forlorn and wilde, [ ] The seat of desolation, voyd of light, Save what the glimmering of these livid flames Casts pale and dreadful? Thither let us tend From off the tossing of these fiery waves, There rest, if any rest can harbour there, [ ] And reassembling our afflicted Powers , Consult how we may henceforth most offend Our Enemy, our own loss how repair, How overcome this dire Calamity, What reinforcement we may gain from Hope, [ ] If not what resolution from despare.

Him followed his next Mate, Both glorying to have scap't the Stygian flood As Gods , and by thir own recover'd strength, [ ] Not by the sufferance of supernal Power.

Is this the Region, this the Soil, the Clime , Said then the lost Arch-Angel, this the seat That we must change for Heav'n, this mournful gloom For that celestial light? Be it so, since he [ ] Who now is Sovran can dispose and bid What shall be right: fardest from him is best Whom reason hath equald, force hath made supream Above his equals.

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n.

Here at least We shall be free; th' Almighty hath not built Here for his envy, will not drive us hence: [ ] Here we may reign secure, and in my choyce To reign is worth ambition though in Hell: Better to reign in Hell, then serve in Heav'n. But wherefore let we then our faithful friends, Th' associates and copartners of our loss [ ] Lye thus astonisht on th' oblivious Pool , And call them not to share with us their part In this unhappy Mansion, or once more With rallied Arms to try what may be yet Regaind in Heav'n, or what more lost in Hell?

Leader of those Armies bright, Which but th' Onmipotent none could have foyld, If once they hear that voyce, thir liveliest pledge Of hope in fears and dangers, heard so oft [ ] In worst extreams, and on the perilous edge Of battel when it rag'd, in all assaults Thir surest signal, they will soon resume New courage and revive, though now they lye Groveling and prostrate on yon Lake of Fire, [ ] As we erewhile, astounded and amaz'd, No wonder, fall'n such a pernicious highth.

He scarce had ceas't when the superiour Fiend Was moving toward the shoar; his ponderous shield Ethereal temper , massy, large and round, [ ] Behind him cast; the broad circumference Hung on his shoulders like the Moon, whose Orb At Ev'ning from the top of Fesole, Or in Valdarno, to descry new Lands, [ ] Rivers or Mountains in her spotty Globe. His Spear, to equal which the tallest Pine Hewn on Norwegian hills, to be the Mast Of some great Ammiral , were but a wand, He walkt with to support uneasie steps [ ] Over the burning Marle , not like those steps On Heavens Azure, and the torrid Clime Smote on him sore besides, vaulted with Fire; Nathless he so endur'd, till on the Beach Of that inflamed Sea, he stood and call'd [ ] His Legions, Angel Forms, who lay intrans't Thick as Autumnal Leaves that strow the Brooks In Vallombrosa, where th' Etrurian shades High overarch't imbowr; or scatterd sedge Afloat, when with fierce Winds Orion arm'd [ ] Hath vext the Red-Sea Coast, whose waves orethrew Busiris and his Memphian Chivalry, While with perfidious hatred they pursu'd The Sojourners of Goshen, who beheld From the safe shore thir floating Carkases [ ] And broken Chariot Wheels, so thick bestrown Abject and lost lay these, covering the Flood, Under amazement of thir hideous change.

John Milton's Paradise Lost In Plain English

He call'd so loud, that all the hollow Deep Of Hell resounded. Princes, Potentates, [ ] Warriers, the Flowr of Heav'n, once yours, now lost, If such astonishment as this can sieze Eternal spirits; or have ye chos'n this place After the toyl of Battel to repose Your wearied vertue , for the ease you find [ ] To slumber here, as in the Vales of Heav'n?

Or in this abject posture have ye sworn To adore the Conquerour? Awake, arise, or be for ever fall'n. Nor did they not perceave the evil plight [ ] In which they were, or the fierce pains not feel; Yet to thir Generals Voyce they soon obeyd Innumerable.

As when the potent Rod Of Amrams Son in Egypts evill day Wav'd round the Coast, up call'd a pitchy cloud [ ] Of Locusts, warping on the Eastern Wind, That ore the Realm of impious Pharaoh hung Like Night, and darken'd all the Land of Nile: So numberless were those bad Angels seen Hovering on wing under the Cope of Hell [ ] 'Twixt upper, nether, and surrounding Fires; Till, as a signal giv'n, th' uplifted Spear Of thir great Sultan waving to direct Thir course, in even ballance down they light On the firm brimstone, and fill all the Plain; [ ] A multitude, like which the populous North Pour'd never from her frozen loyns, to pass Rhene or the Danaw, when her barbarous Sons Came like a Deluge on the South, and spread Beneath Gibralter to the Lybian sands.

Nor had they yet among the Sons of Eve Got them new Names , till wandring ore the Earth, [ ] Through Gods high sufferance for the tryal of man, By falsities and lyes the greatest part Of Mankind they corrupted to forsake God thir Creator, and th' invisible Glory of him that made them, to transform [ ] Oft to the Image of a Brute, adorn'd With gay Religions full of Pomp and Gold, Then were they known to men by various Names, And various Idols through the Heathen World.

First Moloch, horrid King besmear'd with blood Of human sacrifice, and parents tears, Though for the noyse of Drums and Timbrels loud Thir childrens cries unheard , that past through fire [ ] To his grim Idol. Peor his other Name, when he entic'd Israel in Sittim on thir march from Nile To do him wanton rites, which cost them woe. Yet thence his lustful Orgies he enlarg'd [ ] Even to that Hill of scandal , by the Grove Of Moloch homicide, lust hard by hate; Till good Josiah drove them thence to Hell.

For Spirits when they please Can either Sex assume, or both; so soft And uncompounded is thir Essence pure , [ ] Not ti'd or manacl'd with joynt or limb, Nor founded on the brittle strength of bones, Like cumbrous flesh; but in what shape they choose Dilated or condens't, bright or obscure, Can execute thir aerie purposes, [ ] And works of love or enmity fulfill.Yet, that debt paid, you will not leave me in the loathsome grave, his prey, nor suffer my pure soul to dwell in death, forever corrupted.

After these appeared a crew under names of old renown, Osiris, Isis, Horus and their train, who with monstrous shapes and sorceries deluded fanatic Egypt and her priests to seek their wandering gods disguised in animal forms rather then human. Do not vainly hope to be invulnerable in those bright arms, even though they were tempered in heaven, for none can resist its mortal blow, save he who reigns above. Thick cataracts have quenched their lenses, and dimly suffused my sight like a veil.

For the weight of our last hope falls on whom we send. Farewell, happy fields where joy dwells forever.

FERN from Massachusetts
Feel free to read my other posts. I take pleasure in horseback riding. I do fancy exploring ePub and PDF books unfortunately.