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THE STRATEGIST BE THE LEADER YOUR BUSINESS NEEDS PDF

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Editorial Reviews. Review. “Cynthia Montgomery stimulates you as a business leader, to be owner, creator and ongoing steward of your company's strategy. outline: it explores what are the key responsibilities of a strategist and how to differentiate leader.” (p.5) The book is suitable as a bright read for a business owner, as Are we doing today what we need to do in order to matter tomorrow?. The Strategist: Be the Leader Your Business Needs The Options Strategist The fearless executive: finding the courage to trust your talents and be the leader .


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BE THE LEADER YOUR BUSINESS NEEDS . but to equip and inspire you to be a strategist, a leader whose time at the helm could have a profound effect on. Montgomery C. The Strategist: Be the Leader Your Business Needs. Файл формата pdf; размером 3,02 МБ. Добавлен пользователем. Your Business Needs. by Cynthia A. Montgomery Montgomery, Cynthia A. The Strategist: Be the Leader Your Business Needs. New York: HarperCollins.

Over a series of weeks and months, Montgomery puts these accomplished executives through their paces.

The Strategist: Be the Leader Your Business Needs

Using case discussions, after-hours talks, and participants' own strategy dilemmas, she illuminates what strategy is, why it's important, and what it takes to lead the effort. En route, she equips them to confront the most essential question facing every business leader: Does this company truly matter? In doing so, she shows that strategy is not just a tool for outwitting the competition; it is the most powerful means a leader has for shaping a company itself. The Strategist exposes all business leaders—whether they run a global enterprise or a small business—to the invaluable insights Montgomery shares with these privileged executives.

By distilling the experiences and insights gleaned in the classroom, Montgomery helps leaders develop the skills and sensibilities they need to become strategists themselves.

It is a difficult role, but little else one does as a leader is likely to matter more. In the end, it is important to remember that we cannot become what we need to be by remaining what we are.

Strategy is a fundamental course at nearly every business school in the world. I have been privileged to teach variations of it for more than thirty years—first at the University of Michigan, then at the Kellogg School at Northwestern, and for the last twenty-plus years at the Harvard Business School.

For most of that time I worked with MBA students, until the center of my teaching shifted to executive education. Even more important, teaching in EOP forced me to confront how strategy is really made in most businesses, and by whom.

All of this convinced me that it is time for a change. Time to approach strategy in a different way and time to transform the process from a mechanical, analytical activity to something deeper, more meaningful, and far more rewarding for a leader. Fifty years ago strategy was taught as part of the general management curriculum in most business schools.

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This vital role encompassed both formulation and implementation: Heuristically, managers used the ubiquitous SWOT model Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats to assess their businesses and identify attractive competitive positions. How best to do that, though, was far from clear.

Other than making lists of various factors to consider, managers had few tools to help them make these judgments. Porter broke important new ground in the field. This led to a revolution in both the practice and teaching of strategy. In particular, managers came to understand the profound impact industry forces could have on the success of their businesses and how they could use that information to position their firms propitiously.

Advances over the next few decades not only refined the tools but spawned a whole new industry. Strategy in many ways became the bailiwick of specialists—legions of MBAs and strategy consultants, armed with frameworks, techniques, and data—eager to help managers analyze their industries or position their firms for strategic advantage.

In truth, they had a lot to offer. My own academic training and research in this period reflected this intellectual environment, and what I did in the classroom for many years thereafter was a living embodiment of this new field of strategy.

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In time, though, a host of unintended consequences developed from what in its own right was a very good thing. Most notably, strategy became more about formulation than implementation, and more about getting the analysis right at the outset than living with a strategy over time.

While countless books have been written about strategy in the last thirty years, virtually nothing has been written about the strategist and what this vital role requires of the person who shoulders it. It was classic Shakespeare: As a field, we had hoisted ourselves on our own petard.

We had demoted strategy from the top of the organization to a specialist function. Chasing a new ideal, we had lost sight of the value of what we had—the richness of judgment, the continuity of purpose, the will to commit an organization to a particular path.

With all good intentions, we had backed strategy into a narrow corner and reduced it to a left-brain exercise. In doing so, we lost much of its vitality and much of its connection to the day-to-day life of a company, and we lost sight of what it takes to lead the effort. When I first started working with the group, I used a curriculum that was much like one I would use in any executive program.

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Through a series of class discussions and presentations, we discussed the enduring principles of strategy, the frameworks that capture them, and a series of case studies that brought the concepts and tensions alive.

But in between class sessions, the EOP students—all accomplished executives and entrepreneurs—started to ask if they could meet me in my office to talk about various situations they were facing in their companies.

These conversations often took place at unusual hours, and sometimes lasted far into the evening. Most started out predictably enough: We talked about the conditions in their industries, the strengths and weaknesses of their own companies, and their efforts to build or extend a competitive advantage. Often, though, these conversations took a different turn. Alongside all the conventional questions were ones about what to do when the limits of analysis had been reached and the way forward was still not clear; questions about when to move away from an existing competitive advantage and when to try to stay the course; questions about reinventing a business or identifying a new purpose, a new reason to matter.

Working with these managers, typically over three years, and hearing the stories within the stories, I came to see that we cannot afford to think of strategy as something fixed, a problem that is solved and settled. It is a system that evolves, moves, and changes. In these late-night one-on-one conversations, I also saw something else: I saw the strategist, the human being, the leader.

I saw how responsible these executives feel for getting things right. I saw how invested they are in these choices, and how much is at stake. I saw the energy and commitment they bring to this endeavor. I saw their confidential concerns, too: Am I doing this job well?

Am I providing the leadership my company needs? And, more than anything, I saw in these conversations the tremendous potential these leaders hold in their hands, and the profound opportunity they have to make a difference in the life of a company. In those moments together, we both came to understand that if their businesses were going to pull away from the pack, to create a difference that mattered, it had to start with them.

In all our lives there are times of learning that transform us, that distance us from the familiar, and make us see it in new ways.

For me, the EOP experience was one of those times. It not only changed some of my most central views about strategy; it gave me a new perspective on the strategist, and on the power and promise of that role. In these pages I will share with you what I have learned. In doing so, I hope that you will gain a new understanding about what strategy is, why it matters, and what you must do to lead the effort.

I also hope that you will come to see that beyond the analytics and insights of highly skilled advisors and the exhortations of how-to guides, there is a need for judgment, for continuity, for responsibility that rests squarely with you—as a leader. Fried and Charles C. Short-termism ; quarterly capitalism ; share buybacks ; open market repurchases ; dividends ; equity issuances ; seasoned equity offerings ; equity compensastion ; Acquisitions ; Payout policy ; capital flows ; capital distribution ; Working Capital ; Business and Shareholder Relations ; Acquisition ;.

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HBS Home. Business and Environment Business History Entrepreneurship. Finance Globalization Health Care. Technology and Innovation. Finance General Management Marketing. Technology and Operations Management. Book The Strategist: Print Email.

About the Author Cynthia A. View Details. Cite View Details Educators Related. Wang and Jonah Goldberg Citation:Are you sure you want to delete this list? In those moments together, we both came to understand that if their businesses were going to pull away from the pack, to create a difference that mattered, it had to start with them. HBS Home. It is a difficult role, but little else one does as a leader is likely to matter more.

Montgomery C. The Strategist: Be the Leader Your Business Needs

Other than making lists of various factors to consider, managers had few tools to help them make these judgments. This was the case of Masco. It is a difficult role, but little else one does as a leader is likely to matter more.

But in between class sessions, the EOP students—all accomplished executives and entrepreneurs—started to ask if they could meet me in my office to talk about various situations they were facing in their companies. Richard, a third-generation U.

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