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THE FIRST MUSLIM BOOK PDF

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The extraordinary life of the man who founded Islam, and the world he inhabited —and remade. Lesley Hazleton's new book, Agnostic: A Spirited. author may make changes on these proofs before the book goes to press. The. FIRST MUSLIM. Also by Lesley Hazleton. After the Prophet: The Epic Story of the . Editorial Reviews. From Booklist. It is surprising how little most people know about the life of the . After reading this book I got Hazleton's book After the First Muslim which was written prior to the one I am reviewing. I hope Hazleton writes more.


The First Muslim Book Pdf

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The extraordinary life of the man who founded Islam, and the world he inhabitedâ €”and remade. Lesley Hazleton's new book, Agnostic: A. Download Best Book The First Muslim: The Story of Muhammad, ^^PDF FILE Download The First Muslim: The Story of Muhammad Free. [PDF] Download [PDF] The First Muslim: The Story of Muhammad By Description this book Please continue to the next pageDownload [PDF].

Nov 09, Mostafa Mostafa rated it really liked it. In general, this book promises a change with huge effects on those who read it with no background about tbe history of islam.. Amid the false images arising nowadays about islam being all abt terrorism Hazelton sends a message abt the greatness of such a man, such a religion and the holiness of the Quran..

Nov 04, Wanda added it Shelves: You need to be on the outside looking in if you want to write a unbiased biography of a religious figure. Both books were good and gave me unexpected insights into each religion and sometimes all religions. I knew next to nothing about the origins of Islam. The First Muslim has educated me about the tenets of that religion and Having recently read Zealot, written by a non-Christian author about Jesus, I felt it was only fair that I also read The First Muslim by a non-Muslim author about Mohammed.

The First Muslim has educated me about the tenets of that religion and given some insights into the psychology of its followers, in the same way that Zealot gave me new ways to understand both Judaism and Christianity. Suddenly, certain reactions and opinions by religious groups are explained.

Why are the Jewish settlers so aggressive about building in Palestinian territory? He was overwhelmed not with conviction, but by doubt. He was sure of only one thing: Not to a middle-aged man who had hoped perhaps at most a simple moment of grace instead of this vast blinding weight of revelation. If he no longer feared for his life, he certainly feared his sanity, painfully aware that too many nights in solitary meditation might have driven him over the edge. His Power is just too great for us mere humans to grasp the totality of His Purpose.

His many images are somehow just a reflection of the enigma of his Sacred Singleness. For instance, for us Christians, in the Old Testament , He seemingly appeared as the God of Wrath, of Punishment and of the Law, an ascetic disciplinarian who wanted to assert His Will, demanding it from His people with great authority while in the New Testament , Jesus Christ changed His Persona into the God of Light, making Him crystal clear as the God of Humility with a limitless capacity for forgiveness and bountiful means for mercy.

A love from which transcendence is still beyond our collective thoughts, beyond our known definitions, yet everything there is deemed by God towards that direction. Reading the story of Muhammad made me realize this even more From the time he was born orphaned, growing up in the boondocks with the Bedouins under the free reign of nature, he learned to appreciate its beauty at a very young age, the natural splendor of its simplicity as his only backdrop with the serene visions of the somewhat endless landscape of the desert golden under the scorching heat of the sun and the contrasting quiet stillness of its open sky at night, Muhammad became attune with Nature, developing a sensitivity similar to Buddha that made him more aware than the rest, becoming more apparent when he went back to Mecca, especially growing up with a notion in his head that he was an outsider even in his own family, he learned to see the discrepancy among the people and all the injustices he recognized that went with it.

With Buddha , the spark of enlightenment was ignited when he noticed the sufferings of other people around him that was in total contrast to his own opulent life. He appeared as an outsider from without as he recognized the true inside was deemed with so much pain and suffering. With Muhammad , he was perhaps physically an outsider in Mecca, but he was truly inside its helm as he appeared from within, part of the majority of its downtrodden milieu.

Buddha withdrew from all worldly things to understand and to attain the full enlightenment while Muhammad must rise to power in domination to attest of what should become. Muhammad also shares the same theological ancestry with Jesus Christ with Abraham as the root of both of their monotheistic belief, but by the time he came to Damascus, which at that time was the melting pot of existing religious beliefs, the Christians had started to have disparate interpretation in the teachings of Jesus Christ that will bring further dissension among them down the line, harbinger to impending inquisitions and persecutions in the future.

This was perhaps what Muhammad had perceived as he discerned these so many truths floating in the air of Damascus sky that conclusively will help him decide when he formed his own separate religion with a force that can be likened to his first moment of revelation, where human senses can do nothing, but be awed with the Divine.

This force that took hold of Muhammad by the time he went on exile in Medina after all the persecution and scrutiny he and his believers went through was thinly explained in the book.

He suddenly changed from Buddha-like-stance , the-turn-the-other-cheek martyr in Mecca into a radical believer with a force of the storm that can crush anything in its path. It was like God Himself sent Him His own legion of army to unite Arabia into one faith, beating the Persians and the Byzantines in their own game of warfare. With the disentanglement of Christianity from its stronghold, Islam began to built its empire that will start to spread all over the world like the will of the wind, reaching the Far East first even before Christianity did.

Apr 09, Ahmad Tekriti rated it really liked it. I'm always wondering about the struggles that faced prophets in their life. Are the straggles that he faced is similar to us?

Did he try to kill himself? This book gave many insight about some of thes I'm always wondering about the struggles that faced prophets in their life. This book gave many insight about some of these questions and let me think about more Sep 19, Liz Janet rated it liked it. An accessible introduction to the life of the prophet Muhammad peace be upon him, but beware, it is mostly interpretation, as well, most books about the prophet are, considering he lived more than a millennial ago.

I am going to recommend her TED Talks because they are quite good. The Doubt essential to faith On Reading the Koran. This one is pretty good but I like Karen Armstrong's version best so far. Those who opposed it did This one is pretty good but I like Karen Armstrong's version best so far.

The First Muslim: The Story of Muhammad

Those who opposed it did make it about him, however. And in so doing, helped him. The tribal totems were powerful as intercessors, their subservience clear in the collective name given to Lat, Manat, and Uzza: That was a direct attack on the whole tradition of tribal identity.

Say whatever you want, for, by God, I will never give you up on any account. He had already expelled Muhammad from the clan and would be only too glad to accept monetary compensation for his death. Clearly aware that this resolved nothing, he kept returning to the question. Muslim anti-Semitism and Jewish Islamophobia. The massacre of the Qureyz was indeed a demonstration of ruthlessness, but they were, in a sense, collateral damage.

If there were another god along with God, I think he would have availed me somewhat before now. And referring to Muhammad in the formal third person, he added: Mecca had formally surrendered. For those who worship God, God is alive, immortal.

Jun 25, Donna rated it it was amazing. The First Muslim is a beautifully written and very readable account of the life of the prophet Muhammad and the rise of Islam.

The author incorporates ideas about the importance of clan, lineage, home, retaliation, honor and faith in ancient Arabic culture, the remnants of which are influencing the Middle East today. In this non typical biography, she uses history, philosophy, sociology and even modern day psychology to interpret the mass of information that has accumulated about Muhammad over t The First Muslim is a beautifully written and very readable account of the life of the prophet Muhammad and the rise of Islam.

In this non typical biography, she uses history, philosophy, sociology and even modern day psychology to interpret the mass of information that has accumulated about Muhammad over the centuries. Muhammad was orphaned shortly after birth.

From his lowly beginnings as an outsider in a patriarchal society, he gradually rose to distinguish himself as a businessman. After his initial vision on Mount Hira, Muhammad evolves from messenger to prophet to leader of what would become Islam.

The book describes his exile from Mecca and eventual return, his strategies for dispatching enemies and forming alliances, as well as the origins for the veiling of women and the Shia vs Sunni divisions. On the negative side, the author makes speculative statements that seem out of place in nonfiction writing. So-and-so was thought to have said such and such and therefore, we can deduce that he must have felt this or that way. Nevertheless, the book is fascinating and I feel that it added significantly to my heretofore paltry knowledge about Muhammad and Islam.

Buku ini merupakan buku biografi pertama mengenai Nabi Muhammad S. Menarik untuk membaca sesuatu yang subjeknya sangat rapat dengan agama Islam tetapi ditulis oleh orang bukan Islam. Penulisnya, Lesley Hazleton merupakan seorang agnostik seorang yang tidak menganuti sebarang agama tetapi percaya kepada kewujudan Tuhan. Oleh itu,beliau cenderung untuk mengkaji Nabi Muhammad S.

The First Muslim

Lantas,mungkin apa yang disampaikan oleh Hazleton agak berbeza daripada pandangan umum atau lazim mengenai sejarah nabi terakhir ini.

Namun demikian,Hazleton masih menyandarkan penyelidikannya berdasarkan tiga sumber utama iaitu; a Al-Quran b Sirat Rasul Allah yang ditulis oleh Ibn Ishaq c Tarikh al-Rusul wa al-Muluk ditulis oleh Al-Tabari Namun,secara keseluruhannya,hasil pembacaan saya,Hazleton mempunyai pandangan yang positif kepada Nabi Muhammad S. Sebagai contohnya,Hazleton berpandangan bahawa hukuman bunuh secara beramai-ramai ke atas Bani Qureyz kanak-kanak dan wanita dijadikan hamba tawanan dan harta benda dirampas yang diperintahkan oleh Nabi Muhammad sebagai kejam dan hanya mahu menjadikan Bani Qureyz sebagai kambing hitam.

Tetapi,pada masa yang sama,Hazleton juga mengakui bahawa baginda berbuat demikian untuk menunjukkan bahawa Nabi Muhammad merupakan seorang pemimpin yang tegas dan akan bertindak agresif kepada mana-mana pihak yang memusuhinya. Langkah ini penting dilaksanakan untuk memastikan tiada lagi pihak yang mahu mempertikaikan atau memperkecilkan pemerintahan baginda. Jan 19, Inzemamul Haque rated it liked it Shelves: The author is very critical in her approach to find the truth in history especially when there are incidences of miracles.

The author looks unbiased throughout the book. If the reader is Muslim, he or she may feel at very few almost rare places that Muhammad peace be upon him is shown in bad light. But this paragraph from the author herself says it all. Muhammad had reversed the terms of engagement, turning apparent weakness into strength The author is very critical in her approach to find the truth in history especially when there are incidences of miracles.

Muhammad had reversed the terms of engagement, turning apparent weakness into strength. He had proved himself as effective unarmed as armed, and used the language of peace as forcefully as that of war.

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In fact it was precisely this dual aspect of him that would so confound his critics and his followers alike. Whether in the seventh century or the twenty-first, he would frustrate the simplistic terms of those trying to pigeonhole him as either a "prophet of peace" or a "prophet of war. A complex man carving a huge profile in history, his vision went beyond seemingly irreconcilable opposites.

He had allowed himself to be turned away from Mecca in the full knowledge that he had in fact completed the first stage of his return. I have read her another book titled "After the prophet. Nov 28, Cassandra rated it really liked it.

It's worth noting at the beginning of this review that my understanding of the life of Muhammad was pretty rudimentary before this book.

I really enjoyed the way the author tried to bring the human aspect of the Prophet to life, especially in his early years, sifting through some of the miracle stories to more humble beginnings. This isn't exactly a biography, because while it pulls mostly from the writings of ibn-Ishaq and al-Tabari, both of those were written many years after the death of Muha It's worth noting at the beginning of this review that my understanding of the life of Muhammad was pretty rudimentary before this book.

The Story of Muhammad

This isn't exactly a biography, because while it pulls mostly from the writings of ibn-Ishaq and al-Tabari, both of those were written many years after the death of Muhammed. The author uses information about the history and culture to advance hypotheses about what is "the future written back into the past" and what seems to make sense. She also uses psychology and other disciplines to approximate what Muhammad may have been feeling at the time. Given that, while there are many facts in this book, there is also quite a bit of conjecture as there inevitably is when there isn't much surviving written record from the time of his life but I think the author does a good job of differentiating between the two.

Apr 03, Catalina rated it really liked it. As a non-Muslim I was interested in learning more about Islamic origins and history.

Being that this is the first book of Hazelton that I just read, the author has an immediate and captivating style that is reflective of the characters and of her own questions and rationalisations.

In terms of content, I feel that she does have the right to have her agnostic Jewish background colour her views what book doesn't have bias? While I still question some of the events she has interpreted of the Prophet's life the marriage between the Prophet and Zaynab, for example , it is simple enough to be picked up by any person!

It reads with refreshment, but I wouldn't utilise this book as a primer on Islam. I would have liked to have read more about the Prophet and stories of him rather than just the political events surrounding him. Still, it was certainly worth the read. Jan 14, William Crosby rated it it was amazing.

I found this to be a fast and fascinating read. And this comes from somebody who does not like to read biographies. The book is written as a mostly seamless story which is more than just a biography. So that the flow is not disturbed, all notes are at the end. It does a magnificent job including diverse aspects of culture to further understand Muhammad's life. The perfect book to see the "human" beyond the legend!! The reason I got this book was because I wanted to read something unbiased and objective with regards to Muhammads life.

We've all read about him, what he has done, what he has conquered - his hadeeths, about his actions - but despite knowing all this, I felt I still knew very little of him.

What I really wanted was a fresh vantage point - to be honest I wasnt very interested in dates of conquests and battles, I was more interested in the man, his thoughts and behavior, his character - his chara The reason I got this book was because I wanted to read something unbiased and objective with regards to Muhammads life.

What I really wanted was a fresh vantage point - to be honest I wasnt very interested in dates of conquests and battles, I was more interested in the man, his thoughts and behavior, his character - his character as a man, not as the last prophet.

But unfortunately his prophetic role was such that it was almost impossible to separate the prophet from the man. Every word, every action every comment of his was under such scrutiny, its very unlikely he ever acted on a whim. None of the sugar coated-ness, it almost seems a bit harsh at times, nearly depicting Muhammad as power hungry in some instances, but she also gives viable reasons of why this could be. Its almost tragic, the weight of the last message burdened on this man, knowing that it ends with him and he has to give up everything to ensure Gods message is delivered to his followers.

Its heartbreaking - in the sense, that Muhammad really had no life of his own. His life was his people's, ours. The prophetic role being thrust upon him, the hardships he had to endure, decisions he had to make, was he fearful? And whats even more tragic is, the different versions of crucial events in his life are debated. This book makes a good addition to the various biographies of Muhammad, but what I appreciate was how Hazelton tries to dig deeper and decipher what Muhammad may have been feeling and why.

This is not a detailed history text, but more of a character analysis of Muhammad - why he was chosen and how he went about delivering Gods final message. This book isn't so much a biography, as a study or a critique about the stories abounding about The Prophet.

Hazleton has presented this with reference to Chistianity - drawing parallel as well as contrast, as suitable - to explain the man who was the Prophet. This book presumes the Biblical knowledge and hence saves up on space; but, it would make it a little difficult for non-Christian readers.

Hazleton has attempted to humanise Muhammad, stripping him from all the 'drama' and magic, leaving beh This book isn't so much a biography, as a study or a critique about the stories abounding about The Prophet. Hazleton has attempted to humanise Muhammad, stripping him from all the 'drama' and magic, leaving behind a plausible historic chronicle.

She has shorn his story of all the romance and hence, this a study. Very academic in tone, than religious or novel like. A lot of research has obviously gone into this work. While checking up on this book's reviews, I find either raving 5 stars or, too miserably panning ones! One of them expressed disappointment by asking how was this book called well researched. Well, it is.

If you read it in a non biased way, you have to give Hazleton the credit for her research. Personally, I prefer factual, to the point accounts of real lifes to, romanticed drama fit for a sitcom. Hence, this book was very much to my taste.

It was thought provoking, insightful, inspiring and interesting in equal measures. Hazleton has also given some background information of Muhammad's time, which gives a glimpse to the society prevailing then.

I enjoyed the book. I do not care for the religious context. I wanted to get introduced to Muhammad, the man, the real guy behind the Prophet; and I could meet him in this book. A readable book. I hope this was a balanced review. Mar 22, Richard rated it liked it Shelves: I picked this up because I'd heard Lesley Hazleton speak after the publication of her book on the succession after Muhammad's death, and because i wanted a refresher to Karen Armstrong's "Muhammad: A Prophet for our Time," which I'd read a couple of years ago.

Both books cover the same turf. The First Muslim is a little more imaginative as the author sketches thoughts and conversations that could have happened, I suppose, but are really informed figments. She also describes events that are proba I picked this up because I'd heard Lesley Hazleton speak after the publication of her book on the succession after Muhammad's death, and because i wanted a refresher to Karen Armstrong's "Muhammad: She also describes events that are probably true to the life and times, but again, are made up.

The messing around gives the book a contemporary to the times feel, and allow for that "it reads just like a novel," come on that popular histories are known for, but they get a little grating. The conceit is too obvious. Muhammad's story is fascinating as he rises from rags to riches while struggling with his parentage, and the history of the Koran is equally so as the verses run from revelation to Muhammad covering his tracks with the word of God after personal or political errors.

Taken as a whole, Muhammad was a human with all the failings and an extra helping of the brilliance of the race, and the Koran, by description at least, as much an enlightened mess as the Hebrew and Christian scriptures. It's a quick and easy read, but Armstrong's take, a bit drier was also - oddly - more dramatic. If you're going to read one, go with Karen Armstrong. That being said, I am interested in Hazelton's previous, "After the Prophet.

Extremely interesting! Not having known much at all about his life, I was intrigued by the legends and myths as much as by the hard facts that Lesley Hazleton shares in this book. The reader follows an orphan through a rather di Extremely interesting!

The reader follows an orphan through a rather difficult childhood and adolescence, shares some quiet and happy moments with him as adult — and almost incredulously follows how he changes, starting from the first message on Mount Hira which made him a simple and peaceful messenger to becoming a prophet, a warrior, a leader and something of a tyrant… Lesley Hazleton does not pretend to know everything, but openly admits that sometimes different sources give a rather unclear picture of the facts.

She manages very convincingly to put together the different pieces, to add her insight about the time and place and eventually comes to the most probable conclusion. I only wish that she would write an equally insightful biography about Jesus…! It would be highly informative to compare the lives of these two men who influenced our cultures forever.

Feb 19, Neesa Jamal rated it it was amazing. To read a biography of a man that most people will misquote, and misunderstood by an Agnostic Jewish without prejudice is something unusual for me personally. She understands Muhammad more than I do.

She knows his history correctly more than I thought I knew. She have a logical, realistic love for him that although she never confess in written word Eg; I love Muhammad , it is written all over this biography only if you read it between the lines.

You can feel this by her way of tenderly expla To read a biography of a man that most people will misquote, and misunderstood by an Agnostic Jewish without prejudice is something unusual for me personally.

You can feel this by her way of tenderly explaining the history perfectly. This might sound weird, but I cried reading few sentences in some random chapters in this book that touches my heart until today. And now I know. Thank you, Lesley Hazleton. Thank you for this beautiful gift to me. Regards, Agent N. A muslim by choice. Dec 19, Komal Rauf rated it really liked it.

A well researched historical account on a very difficult personality which the author has with factually, sensitively and with great respect. A definite read for anyone interested in understanding the core of Islam beyond hearsay. Page numbering for 3 17 Aug 03, Humanizing a Prophet 2 31 May 17, Readers Also Enjoyed. About Lesley Hazleton. Lesley Hazleton. My new book 'Jezebel: Yes, she was framed.

No, she was no harlot. How did a child shunted to the margins end up revolutionizing his world?

How did a merchant come to challenge the established order with a new vision of social justice? How did the pariah hounded out of Mecca turn exile into a new and victorious beginning? How did the outsider become the ultimate insider? The First Muslim illuminates not only an immensely significant figure but his lastingly relevant legacy. It makes its subject vivid and immediate. Here she has brought to life a man about whom much has been written and whom millions revere, yet about whose actual life very little is known… A very readable book.

What she uncovers is a complex yet utterly relatable man whose personal trials and triumphs changed the course of history. This is a wonderful book. This is the most readable, engaging study of Muhammad I have ever come across. An absolute delight and indispensable for believers and non-believers alike.

Read An Excerpt. Paperback —. Buy the Ebook: Add to Cart. About The First Muslim The extraordinary life of the man who founded Islam, and the world he inhabited—and remade.

Also by Lesley Hazleton. See all books by Lesley Hazleton. Product Details.Namun demikian,Hazleton masih menyandarkan penyelidikannya berdasarkan tiga sumber utama iaitu; a Al-Quran b Sirat Rasul Allah yang ditulis oleh Ibn Ishaq c Tarikh al-Rusul wa al-Muluk ditulis oleh Al-Tabari Namun,secara keseluruhannya,hasil pembacaan saya,Hazleton mempunyai pandangan yang positif kepada Nabi Muhammad S.

Jan 14, William Crosby rated it it was amazing. This research paper discusses her approach to the life of the Prophet Seerah in the light of her book. Cancel Save.

Lesley doesn't change her style in this book. This is easily understandable as her background is Jewish.

EFFIE from Kansas
Look through my other posts. One of my hobbies is shortwave listening. I do enjoy studying docunments arrogantly .