A WAR OF GIFTS PDF

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A War of Gifts: An Ender Story · Read more · A War of Gifts: An Ender Story. Read more · A War of Gifts An Ender Story · Read more · A time of gifts. Read more. A War of Gifts: An Ender Story by Orson Scott Card; 4 editions; First published in ; Subjects: Ender Wiggin (Fictitious character), Accessible book, Protected. Start by marking “A War of Gifts (Ender's Saga, #)” as Want to Read: Orson Scott Card offers a Christmas gift to his millions of fans with A War of Gifts, a short novel set during Ender Wiggin's first years at the Battle School where it is forbidden to celebrate religious.


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View A War Of Gifts (Orson Scott Card).pdf from ENG / at Queen's College Old Boys' Association Secondary School. Orson Scott Card A War of Gifts An Ender. A War of Gifts: An Ender Story () is a science fiction novel by American writer Orson Scott Card. This book is set in Card's Ender's Game series and takes. Orson Scott Card offers a Christmas gift to his millions of fans with A War of Gifts, a short novel set during Ender Wiggin's first years at the Battle School where it.

Community Reviews.

Showing Rating details. Sort order. I picked up this novella in the library one day, thinking, hey, here's a story in the Enderverse that I haven't read yet. Read it in about an hour, thought, not great, not bad, maybe a 3-star read. I get on Goodreads, pull up "A War of Gifts," and there it is: I've already given this book a 3-star rating. And I didn't recognize it at all.

So this raises some interesting questions: Was I thinking about a different Ender story when I originally rated it? Was it so unmemorable that I read it a few y I picked up this novella in the library one day, thinking, hey, here's a story in the Enderverse that I haven't read yet.

Was it so unmemorable that I read it a few years ago, rated it and then completely forgot it? Am I an unknowing time traveler?

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I really want that last answer to be the right one. I once read a quote from Orson Scott Card in which he said that he likes to find two unrelated ideas that grab him, and then combine them into one story. It seems pretty evident that that's what he did here. There's the thread about the religious fundamentalist preacher with feet of clay, whose obedient son is trying to get himself turfed out of Battle School, and there's the thread about the kids in Battle School trying to find subversive ways to keep observing Christmas and, maybe, their religions.

These stories mesh reasonably well, but it's a bit awkward, especially when you add Ender saving the day or at least the boy. There's also a chapter about Peter Wiggin that has no real place in this story. Overall, it's a decent story if you're a fan of the Ender Wiggin books, but I wouldn't advise you to spend any significant amount of money on it. View all 3 comments. May 20, Flannery rated it liked it Recommends it for: Enderverse Luvvahs.

Recommended to Flannery by: My wallet at Parkplace Books. You know that part in Good Will Hunting when Robin Williams finally gets Matt Damon to realize that his childhood abuse was not his fault?

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Yeah, this book is kind of like that except I didn't want to sleep with the main character which would be illegal since he is 8 and I didn't get the visual of how weird looking Matt Damon is when he cries. What's that? You want an actual review? Well, FU. I think that's in the spirit of all the gift-giving and moral value reaffirmations that abound in this b You know that part in Good Will Hunting when Robin Williams finally gets Matt Damon to realize that his childhood abuse was not his fault?

I think that's in the spirit of all the gift-giving and moral value reaffirmations that abound in this book. View all 8 comments. Fans of the Enderverse. For everyone who is a loyal Ender fan, this novella will not disappoint! In this interesting story of faith, we get to journey back to Battle School again. While the story centers on a new character from Rat Army, Zeck, many of my favorite characters from the original series are present, including Ender and Dink.

I loved getting another glimpse at Ender's journey and Dink's non-conformity. But, what makes this story compelling is the moral debates at its center. Zeck refuses to fight in Battle Sc For everyone who is a loyal Ender fan, this novella will not disappoint! Zeck refuses to fight in Battle School because his zealot preacher father taught pacifism. But, the irony is that while Zeck was taught pacifism, his father brutally beat him. Zeck still holds the emotional and physical scars of those beatings and tries everything within his power to get the other students to hate him and the administration to send him home.

Along the way, he inspires Dink to lead a rebellion against the school policy of no religious or cultural observances which is at the core of this book.

A sort of morality play set in futuristic space, the short story brings up some interesting points about hypocrisy and zealotry within religious beliefs. But, Ender fans will cheer the loudest when he figures out how to help Zeck face his past. Ender proves to us why he is the right leader to save humanity. View 2 comments.

"Ender's Stocking"

Dec 04, Marty Reeder rated it it was amazing Shelves: Card is always an insightful author, but nothing ever rings as true and as strong as when he takes his readers up to that same spot where his ride to fame took him three decades ago.

A War of Gifts isn't even a novel. It's an extended short story, really. And it should be commercial drivel, since it was specifically made for the Christmas season. There are a lot of things it should have been, but instead it was What is it with Orson Scott Card's Ender books, particularly the Battle School ones?

There are a lot of things it should have been, but instead it was a succinct, powerful tale that legitimately makes Ender into as much a hero as any of his other stories. This is not a throwaway, seasonal fluff story, as far as I'm concerned.

It belongs right up there along with the rest of Card's best works, as well as any other author's. Sometimes, it seems as if Orson Scott Card refuses to give up on this Ender Universe, and certainly it has paid his bills for many years now, but I don't care what the motivation is, the results are extraordinary, and if he doesn't want to stop, then I will only encourage him more.

I read this one when it first appeared a decade ago and listened to the audio version last week during a long drive. It's a fine Christmas story even if Connie Willis didn't write it.

It's set while Ender is at the Battle School during the first volume of his saga, but doesn't seem to me to conflict any with that story; this is a very short interlude. It seemed to me to highlight Card's own philosophy and perhaps conflicted perceptions, while making sage and subtle observations about the nature I read this one when it first appeared a decade ago and listened to the audio version last week during a long drive.

It seemed to me to highlight Card's own philosophy and perhaps conflicted perceptions, while making sage and subtle observations about the nature of abuse and friendship.

I recommend it highly for the season. Dec 29, Relyn rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: I read this tiny book late Christmas night because Jeffrey asked me to. So far, in nearly twenty years, I've only disliked three books he's asked me to read.

He has a pretty good track record, I'd say. I think Orson Scott Card is one of the greatest living writers. It doesn't matter what he writes, it is powerful and the characters feel like living, breathing friends or enemies. I am not a sci-fi fan. In fact, I never read it. About seven years ago Jeffrey asked me and asked me to read Ender's I read this tiny book late Christmas night because Jeffrey asked me to.

About seven years ago Jeffrey asked me and asked me to read Ender's Game. I finally listened to it and was amazed. This book is perfect. Surprising, compelling, living, and breathing all on it's own.

The kind of book that you just know goes on without you as it sits on the shelf. The kind of characters that your thoughts repeatedly return to because you want to make sure you are doing well. Back to A War of Gifts. Jeffrey asked me to read this tiny Ender book and I did. The only thing that bothered me about the book is that there isn't more. What happens to Zeck!!!??!??!?!?!

Still wondering what ever happens to Zeck. It keeps him motivated and I am on hand to fetch and carry and jump up and hand him things so he can keep working.

Anyway, this is one of the books he chose for me to read aloud. We both love the Enderverse. I want more Zeck! Jan 06, Christopher Smith rated it really liked it Shelves: This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Great stories sometimes crop up where you least expect them. At first glance, it seemed to be everything I hate in a novel.

A thirteen dollar price tag for pages of loosely-packed text. A layout designed to appeal to a young-adult audience. A storyline targeted only at diehard fans of a well-established series. A Christmas story, ostensibly meant for seasonal marketing. A title and cover blurb suggesti Great stories sometimes crop up where you least expect them.

Normally I would consign such a book to the dust bin without thinking twice. But this was by Orson Scott Card, after all, so I decided to give it a chance. I was pleasantly surprised. True, A War of Gifts takes barely an afternoon to read. But in that short space Card manages to create in Zeck Morgan a very sophisticated character, and to imbue his fairly complex storyline with several layers of allegorical meaning. Zeck Morgan is a genius child who has grown up in a Puritan Christian cult of which his father is the prophet and leader.

When soldiers come to take young Zeck away to Battle School, he refuses to go on the grounds that he is a pacifist. When they take him anyway, he spends all his time there defying them in the hope that his teachers will give up and send him home. Eventually, aided by Ender, Zeck comes to understand that his father taught pacifism only to talk himself out of compulsively beating his son, and that Zeck wants to go back home not out of love for his father but out of fear that his father will turn his violence on his mother.

Eden was in fact never truly a paradise, but rather a place of ignorance. There are other echoes of LDS teaching in the story, found in a surprising place: Rather, he approves the doctrines but rejects the way they are flaunted in order to prove the superior holiness of the community. Perhaps because he is polemicizing against self-righteousness and hypocrisy in the Mormon community, and wants Mormons to see themselves reflected in this fictional sect.

But if it does, then it does not do so in a straightforward way.

A War Of Gifts (Orson Scott Card).pdf - Orson Scott Card A...

Certainly Zeck becomes angry when the leaders of Battle School forbid him to practice his Christian faith but do not forbid observation of traditions about Santa Claus 67 —basically the same complaint raised by the Religious Right. But the narrative seems ambivalent about whether the complaint is really a valid one. Card clearly sees fundamentalism as a divisive, false kind of religion that is often simply a cover for our own vices When Zeck manages to rile some Muslim students and to get them to pray in open defiance of the rules, other boys chastise him for promoting potentially destructive religious sectarianism On the other hand, there are hints in the story that Card does see religious and cultural traditions as being on the same footing in at least some respects.

As long as religion is peaceful and committed to values like love and generosity—which he indicates even Islam is capable of embracing 90 —religion, like culture, is part of what makes human life worth living. It makes us who we are, and gives us a reason to go on living It is a good thing, and it should not be suppressed. In the end, War of Gifts offers no clear verdict on the much-bewailed attempt of some Leftists to take Christ out of Christmas.

That crusade Card satirizes without mercy Cramming all this complexity into so few pages is no small feat. For any other author the plan of this book would have been a recipe for drudgery. Aug 06, Jeremy rated it it was ok.

It has great characters, and the descriptions of fighting while in zero gravity are amazing. And a bunch are totally shoddy. Why do I keep going back to Card? I guess that demonstrates what an impact his first actually first two or three to be honest books had on me. Another young boy named Zeck is taken to start training. In the end Card seems to not be able to make up his mind what the message is supposed to be, and instead tries to cover all his bases.

Should we admore Zeck for what he believes? Mock him? Is Battle Station making the right choice in being secular, or should they be allowing religious worship? Nothing is really answered. The dialogue seems stilted, the child characters are either talking like adults or like my seven-year-old.

Nov 14, Dan rated it really liked it Recommends it for: Fans of Ender's Game and the Ender Series. It is a story about how two Dutch students observing Sinterklaas Day sets off a war between the students and the faculty over religious observance.

I have found that the books in the Ender Series sort of fall all over the place in quality. Ender's Game and [boook: Ender's Shadow] are both really excellent books. Speaker for the Dead is alright, and I think that Xenocide and Children of the Mind fall off pretty fast quality wise. Likewise, I think that the shadow series quickly approaches Tom Clancy style military techno thriller status.

And while I haven't read all of the short stories that Card has written in the Enderverse, The ones in First Meetings in the Enderverse are sort of hit or miss as well. Orson Scott Card is certainly a good writer. And this book is well written. This novella is not as awesome as Ender's Game or Ender's Shadow. However, in the spectrum of books and stories in this series, it is much closer to the good books and stories, than the not so hot ones. This novella makes the Necessary Cannon cut.

Many of the books in the series have very grand plots, and the characters are caught up in epic struggles over the future of humanity. Certainly, the books are about the bugger wars and their aftermath.

But the really good books in this series are about children, and how they are caught up in these epic story arcs. Ender's Game , Ender's Shadow , and this book all have one thing in common, which makes them so great.

Specifically, they are about the small struggles that children face. They are about bullies, interactions with adults and other children, lessons, and games. The overarching plot just sweeps the children along, but they are focused on these relatively small things that they face in their albeit extraordinary day to day life. I read this book because I am a big fan of Ender's Game and the series in general.

I picked it up because I got a signed first edition, and there was a sticker saying that the proceeds were going to a charity. Dec 24, Naiya rated it it was ok. I received A War of Gifts in the mail a couple days ago, just in time for the Holidays, and finished it in under an hour last night.

When Dink makes an impulsive gift to Flip for Sinterklaas Day, that small act sets off a chain reaction of rebellion, kindness, resentment, and religious tension through the school.

The story will be a treat for long-time Card readers. The book is filled with Easter eggs, and fans will be making connections left and right—here is the Rat Army, there is Dink remembering an off-hand commend he made to Ender, and here are the seeds being sown for the Muslim Caliphate from the Shadow series. We see Colonel Graff as he deals with the children and get a glimpse of a pre-Christmas crisis in the Wiggins household on Earth.

While the religious and moral Message capital M here, please part of the novella jarred me, the story wraps up with a lovely bit of bittersweet feel-goodness. It also puts the Shadow series books solidly back on my to-read list. I have questions now: Was the harsh treatment of Peter by his mother really part of the family dynamic?

A war of gifts : an Ender story

Does Orson Scott Card deal less superficially with religious issues when he has the elbow room of a novel-length piece? I want to read more Card now, and that is the perfect Christmas present. View 1 comment. More Christmas-themed stories should be like this. Smart, thoughtful, and brimming with a Christmas message that doesn't come across as being forced, unrealistic, or saccharine.

Of course, it helps that the whole thing is written by Orson Scott Card and set in the Enderverse. Hard to go wrong, in that regard. Card is one of the few writers who can write deeply about religious issues without alienating half his audience More Christmas-themed stories should be like this.

Card is one of the few writers who can write deeply about religious issues without alienating half his audience.

Mar 13, Shelli rated it it was amazing Shelves: Merry Christmas to me! I loved it. At first, I missed Ender in it, but I really enjoyed getting to know more about Dink. I really like him too. When Ender showed up in the story I was so excited and it did not disappoint. Can I possibly love Ender more than I already do? Thank you Orson Scott Card for this thought provoking little gem and for giving me more time to spend in Ender Merry Christmas to me!

Thank you Orson Scott Card for this thought provoking little gem and for giving me more time to spend in Ender's world! If you are an Ender fan, give yourself a little gift this holiday season and read this!

View all 4 comments. Dec 08, LemonLinda rated it it was amazing. This was an excellent book to read in December - a perfect Christmas visit with Ender, Dink and others in Battle School.

It is a very short book packed with a lot of content regarding war, peace, religion, abuse, respect for other beliefs, tolerance, etc. If you loved Ender as I did and would like a little more of him tied up in a Christmas package, then you should definitely treat yourself to this book. I did the audio version and was so taken with it that I listened twice back to back and was This was an excellent book to read in December - a perfect Christmas visit with Ender, Dink and others in Battle School.

I did the audio version and was so taken with it that I listened twice back to back and was just as entrapped the second time! Dec 24, RJ rated it liked it. A Christmas-themed novella that takes place during Ender's Game , probably interesting only to those who have read the original story and definitely not required reading even for those who have read other books in the series.

Jul 19, Chrissy rated it it was amazing Shelves: This book got me right in the feels. I disliked reading from the point of view of an unlikeable character and another from a minor one but it definitely gave me a clearer perspective of Battle School and what the kids had to go through.

Loved it. Jun 26, Ed Erwin rated it really liked it Shelves: There are many reasons I would expect to not like this. It is a small story set in a book series that I'm only lukewarm about.

I would think there would be no need to add yet another story to a series that has dragged on and on. And it is a Christmas story, in which case the author could easily just "phone it in" and the fans would still appreciate it.

And it deals indirectly with the "war on Christmas" which I think is a phony war. Furthermore I don't like the author's political positions in There are many reasons I would expect to not like this. Furthermore I don't like the author's political positions in general. And I don't like Christmas stories. Except the Heat Miser. Love him! In addition to being set during Ender's Game and Ender's Shadow , the Islamic counter reaction to the Christmas celebrations in A War of Gifts sows the seeds for the creation of the Muslim Caliphate by Battle School graduates which plays a major role in the Shadow series.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Dewey Decimal. Novels portal. Card, Orson Scott November A War of Gifts. Wagner, "A War of Gifts: A review" SF Reviews , A review" SF Site , A review" SciFi.

Decision Points. WordFire Press. This is its first anthology appearance, and the first in a form slightly abridged by the author. Works by Orson Scott Card. Ender's Game series. First Meetings A War of Gifts: An Ender Story Children of the Fleet Comics Film. Ender Wiggin Formics Jane. Organizations Planets. The Tales of Alvin Maker.I picked up this novella in the library one day, thinking, hey, here's a story in the Enderverse that I haven't read yet.

To ask other readers questions about A War of Gifts , please sign up. Jun 02, Fatesocruel rated it really liked it. But Dink Meeker, one of the older students, doesn't see it that way. This little taste is a good stepping stone for getting back into this series and the Enderverse.

Orson Scott Card offers a Christmas gift to his millions of fans with A War of Gifts , a short novel set during Ender Wiggin's first years at the Battle School where it is forbidden to celebrate religious holidays.

Joyeux Noel. Books by Orson Scott Card.

Wagner, "A War of Gifts: As it happens, Ender is more of a side character than featured protagonist in this tale.

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