custom-speeches.com Personal Growth Stephen King Langoliers Book

STEPHEN KING LANGOLIERS BOOK

Wednesday, October 16, 2019


Four Past Midnight is a collection of novellas by Stephen King. It is his second book of this type, Bob proposes the idea that the Langoliers' purpose is to clean up what's left of the past by eating it. Dinah succumbs to her injuries and the other. The Langoliers is a novella written by Stephen King that was included in his collection Four Past Midnight. Contents[show] Summary On a cross-country. Four Past Midnight book. The others were kinda predictable but The Langoliers is one of his finest in my opinion. flag The Stand by Stephen King It by Stephen King The Shining by Stephen King Misery by Stephen King 'Salem's Lot by.


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custom-speeches.com: The Langoliers (): Stephen King, Willem Dafoe: Books. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The first of a four-part audio series from Stephen King's best-selling book, Four Past Midnight. On a redeye flight from Los . Langoliers. [Stephen King] on custom-speeches.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers .

Shooter returns a few days later. Having learned that "Sowing Season" was published two years before Shooter claimed to have written "Secret Window, Secret Garden," Mort confronts Shooter with this information.

An enraged Shooter accuses Mort of lying and demands proof, giving Mort three days to show him his published story. Overnight, he kills Mort's cat and burns down the house of Mort's ex-wife, which contained the magazine issue in which "Sowing Season" was published. Mort orders a new copy of the magazine. Shooter, angry that Mort has involved other people in their business, kills both men and plants evidence framing Mort for the murders.

Upon receiving the magazine and returning home, Mort finds that "Sowing Season" has been removed.

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Mort realizes that John Shooter is really his own split personality. Mort had created "Shooter" out of guilt for stealing a story early in his career titled "Crowfoot Mile" and had recently been suspected of another act of plagiarism, although he was innocent the second time.

Tom had not seen Shooter while driving by—he saw Mort, by himself. Mort realizes he burned down his own home, killed his own cat, and murdered two people. He blacks out. Fifteen minutes later he awakens, only to hear who he believes to be Shooter pulling into his driveway, at the time they'd arranged to meet. Desperate for any sign of his own sanity , he rushes outside only to find his ex-wife, Amy.

Devastated, he loses control of his body and mind to Shooter.

Amy discovers that Mort has gone insane, having written the word "Shooter" all over the house. She goes to Mort's study, where "Shooter" attempts to kill her in an ambush. She manages to escape. Mort becomes himself again, addresses Amy, and dies. Dinah succumbs to her injuries and the other characters realise that the trip through the rip has allowed them to come to terms with their regrets.

Because they need to be asleep to survive the rip again, another passenger, Nick Hopewell, volunteers to fly the plane through, knowing that this will cost him his life. The cabin pressure is decreased, and everyone falls into a deep sleep, except for Nick, who is wearing an emergency oxygen mask.

He flies through the rip and disappears.

The survivors awaken, unharmed except for nosebleeds caused by the drop in air pressure. Seemingly, nothing has changed. The plane lands in a deserted Los Angeles. Concluding that now the time rift has brought them a short distance into the future , the group takes shelter against a wall to avoid the airport's human traffic.

A flash hits them and they find themselves in the present again. The Langoliers was adapted for a two-part TV movie in King himself, echoing Alfred Hitchcock 's famous numerous cameos, made a cameo appearance in the film as Craig Toomy's boss during Toomy's hallucination. Mort Rainey is a successful novelist in Maine. One day, he is confronted by a man from Mississippi named John Shooter who claims Mort plagiarized a story he wrote.

Mort vehemently denies ever plagiarizing anything. Shooter leaves, but not before leaving his manuscript, "Secret Window, Secret Garden. When Mort's housemaid recovers the manuscript—thinking it belongs to Mort—he finally reads Shooter's story, discovering that it is almost identical to his short story "Sowing Season.

The only differences are the title, the character's name, the diction , and the ending. Mort becomes disturbed by these findings. Shooter returns a few days later. Having learned that "Sowing Season" was published two years before Shooter claimed to have written "Secret Window, Secret Garden," Mort confronts Shooter with this information.

An enraged Shooter accuses Mort of lying and demands proof, giving Mort three days to show him his published story.

Overnight, he kills Mort's cat and burns down the house of Mort's ex-wife, which contained the magazine issue in which "Sowing Season" was published. Mort orders a new copy of the magazine. Shooter, angry that Mort has involved other people in their business, kills both men and plants evidence framing Mort for the murders.

Upon receiving the magazine and returning home, Mort finds that "Sowing Season" has been removed. Mort realizes that John Shooter is really his own split personality.

Mort had created "Shooter" out of guilt for stealing a story early in his career titled "Crowfoot Mile" and had recently been suspected of another act of plagiarism, although he was innocent the second time. Tom had not seen Shooter while driving by—he saw Mort, by himself. Mort realizes he burned down his own home, killed his own cat, and murdered two people.

He blacks out. Fifteen minutes later he awakens, only to hear who he believes to be Shooter pulling into his driveway, at the time they'd arranged to meet.

Desperate for any sign of his own sanity , he rushes outside only to find his ex-wife, Amy. Devastated, he loses control of his body and mind to Shooter. Amy discovers that Mort has gone insane, having written the word "Shooter" all over the house.

She goes to Mort's study, where "Shooter" attempts to kill her in an ambush. She manages to escape. Mort becomes himself again, addresses Amy, and dies.

Later, Amy and Ted Milner—a man she had an affair with before divorcing Mort—discuss her ex-husband's motives. She insists that Mort had become two people, one of them a character so vivid it became real.

She then recalls something Tom witnessed; when he drove past Mort alone, he took a look in his rear view mirror , and saw Shooter with Mort, although transparent. Amy then reveals that while digging through Mort's house, she found Shooter's trademark hat. She took it out to the trash, and planted it right-side up on a trash bag.

The Langoliers

When she returned, she found a note from Shooter inside the overturned hat, revealing that he has traveled back to Mississippi with the story he came for, "Crowfoot Mile. The storyline of the movie differs from that of the novel, most notably in their respective endings. In the movie, Mort kills his wife and her lover, while in the novel he is killed before he has a chance to do so. In the movie, after months it is shown that Mort grew corn in his wife's garden, where it is implied that he buried her and her lover, thus removing any proof that he murdered them.

Another difference is the titles of the short stories: King has been the subject of unfounded accusations of plagiarism. A woman claimed that King stole several of her story ideas and based characters from his books on her.

All of her cases have been dismissed. The fake bomb was made of pencils with paperclips wrapped around the erasers. Peebles is asked to give a speech to the Rotary Club.

An office assistant Naomi Higgins directs him to the public library to check out books that might help with his speechwriting.

At the library, he receives a library card and assistance in finding books from an elderly librarian, Ardelia Lortz. Having noticed disturbing posters in the children's library, including one featuring a frightening "Library Policeman" character, he discusses their appropriateness with Ardelia.

After being rebuffed by her, Sam checks out the books with the warning that they must be returned on time or else "I'll have to send the Library Policeman after you. The speech is a success, but Naomi informs Sam that Ardelia Lortz has been dead for many years. Ardelia, as a young woman, committed suicide in after murdering two children and a local deputy sheriff.

The books are accidentally destroyed and a menacing Library Policeman terrorizes Sam at his house. Dave believes Ardelia is seeking revenge and a new host.

While the trio attempt to stop Ardelia's resurrection, Sam recalls a repressed memory: However, the new Library Policeman is not just a recreation of the man from Sam's past, but also an embodiment of Ardelia, who wants Sam as her new host.

Dave dies defending Sam and Naomi from Ardelia. Kevin Delevan receive a Sun Polaroid camera for his fifteenth birthday.

He soon notices that there is something strange about the camera: On a recommendation, Kevin seeks help from Reginald "Pop" Merrill, the wealthy and unscrupulous owner of a junk shop in the town of Castle Rock, Maine.

While just as unsettled by the phenomenon as Kevin, Merrill sees an opportunity to further his own interests; namely, selling the camera to a paranormal enthusiast for a great deal of money.

Four Past Midnight

He manages to switch out the camera for another of the same model, which Kevin destroys. Much to his dismay, however, Merrill cannot rid himself of the Sun as his customers either dismiss it outright as a fake or decline to purchase it due to the discomfort and unease they feel upon viewing the photographs.

Furthermore, Merrill finds himself increasingly compelled to use the Sun — the dog slowly advancing as it transforms into something more savage and monstrous with every picture he takes. In the meantime, Kevin is plagued by recurring nightmares about the dog.See all 5 questions about Four Past Midnight….

Maybe another go around in the future, but for now that's how I feel. So, in my view, three stories that make up one of the best collections of kind of short stories that I know and one that's easily skipped in my view.

The story alone deserves at least three stars. He remembered a pilot telling him once, 'They pay us a hundred thousand dollars or more a year, Brian, and they really do it for just one reason. Am I right?

MILO from Connecticut
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