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THE SHOCK OF THE FALL NATHAN FILER PDF

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Nathan Filer asserts the moral right to be identified as the author of . shock of the fall and the blood on my knee because that was important too. There was the . The Shock of The Fall. View PDF. Costa Book of the Year book | Fiction | World → HarperCollins. An extraordinary portrait of one man's descent into . London, pm 28th January The Shock of the Fall by debut author and mental health nurse Nathan Filer has beaten bestselling novelist Kate Atkinson.


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The Shock of the Fall book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. What begins as the story of a lost boy turns into a story. A CONVERSATION WITH NATHAN FILER. What inspired you to write The Shock of the Fall? Only published authors get asked what inspired them. If you had. Were you shocked by an of the descriptions? The Shock of the Fall. Nathan Filer. ISBN: ‐1-‐‐‐6* Paperback * St. Martin's Press * January

Uploaded with ImageShack. It only seems fitting that someone like me who clearly has an undiagnosed mental disorder would flag the holy hell out of a book about a fellow with a mental disorder.

It also seems fitting that I should let Matthew do Find all of my reviews at: It also seems fitting that I should let Matthew do most of the talking when it comes to telling you what this book is about.

She has a broad chin that she is very self-conscious about.

She sniffs the milk before she drinks it. She loves me. And she is mad. He wears a leather jacket because he used to ride a motorbike. He calls me mon ami. And he loves me.

I really do. And he was never the same after that. I hear them all the time. View all 10 comments. A heartbreakingly beautiful account of trauma, grief, and mental illness. Still processing so much about this story, but it's one that will stay with me for a while. View 1 comment.

It must be me since reviews of this book were overly positive but I honestly don't know why I took the time to finish reading this novel. I'm baffled by comments that this story could make anyone laugh and cry. It is certainly neither stunning nor a book that one would have a hard time putting down, and I would never recommend this book considering the wealth of options available to readers.

The only positive aspect of this novel is that it presents a very realistic glimpse of what mental illness It must be me since reviews of this book were overly positive but I honestly don't know why I took the time to finish reading this novel.

The only positive aspect of this novel is that it presents a very realistic glimpse of what mental illness looks and feels like.

The inner thoughts and perspectives of a young man afflicted with mental illness are viewed in comparison to ways treatment centers, care givers, and family members function to serve the needs of their customers and loved ones.

For me, the focus on Matthew's hard edges detracted from deeper reflection on other characters. The underlying secret behind Matthew's illness was predictable but Filer attempted to attach some level of mystery to the disclosure by waiting until the end of the book to reveal what had happened early in Matthew's life.

The effect was less than satisfying. View all 5 comments. Jun 17, Hannah Green rated it it was amazing Shelves: It seems that, by pure coincidence, I have stumbled into a number of books regarding mental illness, however, the depiction that this book utilises is purely unique. This book is quite simply unlike anything else I have ever read, that is without doubt or question. The use of various fonts interspersed with simple drawings complement well the inconsistent thought process which Matt's thought process follows.

Moreover, the subtle references to past events, without explaining full details, created It seems that, by pure coincidence, I have stumbled into a number of books regarding mental illness, however, the depiction that this book utilises is purely unique.

Moreover, the subtle references to past events, without explaining full details, created momentum in a plot which could simply have been a procession of unrelated ideas. This book encompassed so many themes on death, grieving and mental health issues that it also feels like it lasted so much longer than it really did - though without dragging in the slightest.

Moreover, the experience that Nathan Filer has gained as a mental health nurse is apparent through his irreverent treatment of the subject matter. He does not idealise the staff or the patients, both of them have good days and bad days and this was remarkably refreshing. I could not deny that I did not gain something from the text, but it was also pleasant to find that an author did not shove his or her ideology down my throat to the extent that the book merely appeared distasteful. Even better was that Filer managed to inject sharp bursts of humour which cut through what could otherwise be an oppressive narrative to entertain and make the work somehow more real.

This book is difficult and it is also disturbing. However, it grabbed my attention and held it so that I read the work in a single day yet relished every word. It is beautifully constructed and I'm sure it will not only remain with me for a long time because of its subject matter, but also because of its original construction.

Many have said that this book will go far, and I am certainly inclined to agree with them. View all 3 comments. Jun 09, Regan rated it it was amazing Shelves: Such an unbelievably honest story.

Such an engaging read, straight into my favourites for the year! We are told of the tragic death of Matthew's brother during childhood and how he blames himself for its occurrence. As the reader we are unsure as to whether Matthew is actually guilty of the death of his brother or whether it was just a tragic accident.

Nearer the end of the novel we discover the real story as to how his brother died. We watch as his mental health suffers under the pressure of the self-inflicted guilt surrounding his brothers death. Seeing Matthew grow throughout the novel was touching. I became really attached to him as a character and really wanted him to succeed in overcoming the struggles in his life.

The flow of his words and the way they came off the page was fantastic and I became totally absorbed by his voice. If you like a book with a beautifully captivating protagonist - this may be the one for you!

If you have any interest in mental health or specifically schizophrenia this is a must read! He makes constant remarks about his mental stability, 4. He makes constant remarks about his mental stability, and his reasons for writing the story.

But when Simon died in an accident partly caused by Matthew, he kept on living in Matthews head, a product of his guild and schizophrenia combined. It is almost impossible to discern which parts of his story are true, and which are the product of a damaged mind. Matthew is only nineteen, extremely vulnerable, and his thoughts are all over the place, jumping through space and time from one short chapter to the next.

As Matthews mental health deteriorates, his narration becomes less coherent, often making no sense whatsoever. His relationships with family and his only friend go downhill fast, because, as Matt himself keeps pointing out, schizophrenia is a selfish illness.

There is a lot of resentment between Matt and his parents. His early teen years were rebellious, probably because the schizophrenia already affected his moods, and he made life difficult for everyone, himself included. It is a constant, life-long struggle one needs to accept and make peace with. Nathan Filer is a brilliant young author with so much to offer. His first novel is endearingly odd and in many ways spectacular. I have never read anything quite like this book before, it is a unique experience traveling along in the mindset of a mentally ill young man.

I remember going to the theaters and seeing the movie "Beautiful Minds", I loved this movie, was completely blown away. That is how I felt at the end of this book. First time book for author Nathan Filer, and since he was a mental health nurse in previous years, he knew what he was writing about.

Matthew, our unreliable narrator, has a voice that is very re I have never read anything quite like this book before, it is a unique experience traveling along in the mindset of a mentally ill young man. Matthew, our unreliable narrator, has a voice that is very real and very innocent. After a tragedy in his family, from which he never really recovers, the trigger for his illness is set. We follow him as he tries to live in a life that is difficult and strange, for him things are never simple.

His stays in a psychiatric wards and how his days are spent there, repeatedly going over the same things again and again, doing the same things , again and again.

His courage and determination to get well, to write it all down so it could maybe make sense.

Wanting to have a life, live on his own, the right to live in his own head if he wants too. Little victories, large set backs all poignantly rendered. It was impossible for me not to embrace this character, by books end we know almost everything about him and want everything to work out for him.

In the beginning I wondered what was going on in this book but as the reader continues with the story , he is amply rewarded. More and more things are revealed as Matthews story goes back and forth. Wonderful first novel and look forward to many more. Mar 03, Dem rated it really liked it Recommended to Dem by: I was recommended this novel and was assured it was a good audio book as I struggle with audio as opposed to reading and I have to say the narrator is excellent and he totally draws you into the character of Matthew to such an extinct that you feel it is actually Matthew narrating the story.

Matt Holmes is a 19 year old schizophrenic struggling within the mental health system who decides Nathan Filer's Debut Novel The Shock of The Fall is haunting and very real insight to death and mental illness. Matt Holmes is a 19 year old schizophrenic struggling within the mental health system who decides to put his thoughts to paper when his Nana buys him an old typewriter and hopes his scribbling and notes will be therapeutic and bring him some freedom.

I have an illness, a disease with the shape and sound of a snake. Whenever I learn something new it learns it too My illness knows everything I know. The story is an unsettling and yet important one and really makes you think about the difficult subject of mental illness and the struggles of patients and families.

I believe the author worked in this field himself and therefore had a good insight into the topic he choose to write about. It is by no means an uplifting story but it definitely is worth reading. It may not be everyone's cup of tea but I think if you have a look at the reviews and do choose to read it you will not be disappointed.

This would make a good book club read as there is plenty of discussion in it. I loved the cover and the title of this book and will buy a copy as would like to have it to read another time. I read the majority of this book within the last 24 hours. But good books have the ability to make you forget everything around you, and The Shock of the Fall did just that.

And he was never the same after t I read the majority of this book within the last 24 hours. The Shock of the Fall is all of these books. My favorite aspect of this book was probably the style of narration and the fact that the book was a metafiction in some ways.

The protagonist and narrator Matthew is writing down his own story in various places and over a longer timespan, while his life is still progressing. We learn about conflicts in the past and in the present day. He often interrupts his own narration, reflecting on what he already mentioned and sometimes even foreshadowing on what's going to happen later.

Mentally unstable narrators who offer unique views of the world are so interesting to me, and I love getting inside of their head. There was also a short interview with the author in the back of my edition which offered some insight into his work process, which was really interesting! However, sometimes it feels like a romance is just thrown into the story for good measure.

This book completely worked without romance even though I would still say that it's a book about love So, yeah. That's all I wanted to say for now. If this review has made you curious in any way, definitely give this book a try!

It's worth your time. One of my more unique reads this one, I was wary of the hype around it, but really enjoyed reading it. I love the way the book is written, for a debut novel it's quite exceptional, it's an emotion stirring book and thought provoking too.

It's essentially the story of a young man's descent into mental illness, from childhood events to trying to live as an independent adult and on to life in a mental health care facility. What is spectacular about this book is how immersed in our main character yo One of my more unique reads this one, I was wary of the hype around it, but really enjoyed reading it.

What is spectacular about this book is how immersed in our main character you get, he is telling the story of his life, his feelings, thoughts, his mental illness, it's a bit like sitting in the room with someone, listening avidly to their life story.

And feeling things along the way. The book cleverly gives you snippets of a story, then later on you get more of that story to give you the fuller picture, so there is a lot of a-ha moments, at least there was for me.

I found it sad in parts, I really felt for his struggle against the illness that has hold of him, his moving between lucidity and delusion. Epically done. Is it worth all the hype and a must read book? I think so. It's just different from almost all the books I have read this year. I found it easy to read, interesting, thought provoking and powerful with it's message sent.

I really liked this one. View all 11 comments. May 13, GTF rated it it was ok. Many parts of "The Shock of the Fall" that aim to evoke sentimentality and sorrow, fall a little flat. The narration is very yappy, but that being said there are some nice quotes and occasional tenderness throughout the book.

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The plot was often gearing towards how Simon died, which really could have been told from the very beginning seen as the story was told from the perspective of Matthew who was a witness but instead it wasn't revealed till the very end. I acknowledge that it is a traumatic Many parts of "The Shock of the Fall" that aim to evoke sentimentality and sorrow, fall a little flat.

I acknowledge that it is a traumatic memory for Matthew but it didn't make much sense for him to wait so long to tell the reader given that Simon was one of the main subject matters of the book, and also because he was undergoing treatment for a large part of the story which involved counselling which would usually involve confronting traumatic memories. The entire memory of the death incident should have floated through Matthew's head at least once at an earlier stage in the story.

When a book is being told from the perspective of a character, the reader is inside the character's head and therefore there are no secrets. But maybe I am only complaining about this as I found the death scene anti-climatic and not very surprising or memorable. Another issue with the character of Matthew, is that Matthew is a diagnosed schizophrenic but does not consistently exhibit the disorder. He does act strange on occasion but overall his language is coherent and his thought patterns are not that disrupted.

Come to think of it, I don't think that a story could be told from the perspective of a schizophrenic as it would be very confusing and unintentionally erratic and I say this not with the intention of trivializing schizophrenia but instead highlighting how tragic a condition it really is, as it mentally separates sufferers of the disorder from the real world and sections them into a darker and isolating world due to erosion of cognitive functions.

I think that the story would have been better told from the perspective of Simon's mother or else a third person narrative with Matthew still being a main character. Jan 27, Debumere rated it it was ok. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers.

To view it, click here. Just no. I didn't find this book "engaging" or "deeply moving" or "inventive" at all. These were words used by reviewers from the Daily Telegraph, The Times and some other another author.

The book was not "compelling" either, I've read more compelling stories on the back of the washing powder box. Were the other books vying for the Costa prize that awful? This, I have to find out. I must admit the part I liked the most was when we got to the core of the story, the death of Simon. The writing was Just no. The writing was "compelling" then for a couple of pages.

That's why I gave it two stars. Well maybe 4 I like movement and the story was just too slow. Well done to Nathan Filer for writing a prize winning book - fair play to him. I couldn't do it. It's factual, and, compelling. Apr 05, Teresa rated it it was amazing.

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Nathan Filer is a registered mental health nurse as well as a performance poet and his real-life experience is evident in this, his debut novel. The story is narrated by Matthew, a nineteen year old schizophrenic who recalls the sudden, tragic death of his older brother, Simon — a death which he believes he caused. Likewise, the narrative flits betwee Nathan Filer is a registered mental health nurse as well as a performance poet and his real-life experience is evident in this, his debut novel.

The characters are living, breathing creations, with their own foibles and imperfections. His Mum, is at her wits end, making lots of noise whilst Dad retreats into silence. His grandmother, the wonderful Nanny Noo, accepts Matthew as he is, visiting him at his flat every other Thursday, never passing judgement. Mar 14, Tania rated it liked it Shelves: We are selfish my illness and I. We think only of ourselves. We shape the world around us into messages, into secret whispers spoken only for us.

This was upsetting, but very insightful. To describe the descent into schizophrenia in such a vivid and moving way, you must have some experience with this illness in real life. So it made perfect sense when I read that the author has been a registered mental health nurse, working in psychiatric wards, for more than a decade.

I think what I li We are selfish my illness and I. I think what I liked most about the book, is how Nathan Filer played with time.

The story keeps jumping around in time, and quite a few times I wasn't sure where we were. This is what it must be like for Mat all the time - Time falls through my fingers. You can also feel the incredible sadness that surrounds the whole family after Simon died, and see how everyone tries to cope with the situation. Matthew is one of the most honest characters I've ever met, but that's possibly because his reality is not as fixed as most other people.

Also, I loved the cover. Diciamolo senza preamboli e senza gir di parole. Disturbi mentali. Sbandamento, allucinazione, tanto dolore. E tanto desiderio di abbracciare questo ragazzo solo e in lotta coi su demoni, e la madre che prende pastiglie da anni, il padre impotente, e la nonna che lo va a trovare, e cerca di fare il possibile per aiutarlo.

E poi, il ritmo scandito delle giornate nella clinica psichiatrica e il ricordo di Simon, che ritorna costantemente, sono un continuo pugno nello stomaco. Vogliamo poi parlare, della meravigliosa copertina? Eccome se merita. Jun 06, Kristijan rated it really liked it. Aug 02, Rissa rated it really liked it. Tragic and beautiful. Matt Homes is a young man from Bristol with schizophrenia, writing out his life story which centres around the death of his Downs Syndrome brother when they were children.

The Shock of the Fall is a character portrait rather than a narrative driven book - unfortunately, for a character piece, I never really felt like Matt had much of a w Matt Homes is a young man from Bristol with schizophrenia, writing out his life story which centres around the death of his Downs Syndrome brother when they were children. Did he even need to have schizophrenia? Filer uses his own experience as a mental health nurse to inform the novel and the passages set in the treatment centre were convincing.

Matthew and Shannon need to come to terms with either a tragic event, or a troubled childhood: Like the main characters living on the edge, both novels are borderline fictions that hardly fit in with the current trends in British and Canadian fiction.

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This paper will examine the ways in which these two novels revisit, in a more or less experimental way, postmodern madness in the first case and the orphan narrative in the second. In the context of an ever more globalized literary landscape, it does make sense to examine these two works concurrently. For one thing, both novelists are, each in their own way, border-crossers, writing across genres and mental territories: Strikingly enough, both novels have a troubled teenage narrator, someone in his or her late teens who lives on the edge one is a schizophrenic and the other a drifter , and beyond their domestic plots and disrupted families, they address issues of genealogy, inheritance and adolescent mental health.

But, first and foremost, they remain borderline fictions that ignore some of the big issues of postmodernity. And even though it casually exposes the flaws in the British mental health system, it is far removed from any consideration on psychiatry. What we have, instead, is a self-absorbed narrative, solely focused on the personal experience of the character and mimetic of his obsessive thought-patterns: His therapy is portrayed with wry humour: As a small boy I killed my own brother, and now I must kill him again.

Nineteen-year-old narrator Matthew Holmes is haunted by the death of his brother Simon, which occurred ten years before, and suffers from command hallucinations—spoken orders from his dead brother that compel him to perform certain acts.

The novel thus abounds with examples of mise en abyme , self-portrait and direct address: In addition, the narrator moves back and forth in time in a playful manner, so that the tragedy is re-enacted several times from slightly different angles and the story moves in concentric circles.

Moreover, some pages have a different layout and even a different typography, most notably through the use of a typewriter. As a result, what we have is a hybrid text that pushes the boundaries of the novel towards such forms as the diary, poetic fragments, drama or autofiction.

The novel is more hypnotic than psychotic, as it is based on obsessive patterns and recurring metaphors. Fascinated by elementary particles, Matthew wonders if memories too are made of atoms, because then his brother may still be alive somewhere and his spirit may even someday materialize. Just like the moon circling around the earth, his late moon-faced brother who had Down Syndrome hovers around him and conversely, in a desperate attempt to retrieve his dead sibling in every particle of matter, Matthew gravitates toward Simon.

The Shock of the Fall

This paradigm is closely related to the underlying pattern of the novel, with a story moving in concentric circles: That was beautifully suggested by the original title of the novel, Where the Moon Isn't. That perfect letter. This is from the one-paragraph prologue, which reads like an ode to the letter Y.

And then, the first line of the novel reads: As a newborn, Shannon was dropped on the doorstep of the local YMCA on Vancouver Island and from then on, she has been tossed around from one foster home to another and even abused.

She wants to go back to her roots, and with the help of an eyewitness named Vaughn, she manages to locate her birth mother, Yula. It unfolds very much like a prophecy as well as a countdown , as it is often told in the first person and in the present tense from the point of view of the unborn daughter.Like the main characters living on the edge, both novels are borderline fictions that hardly fit in with the current trends in British and Canadian fiction.

Open Preview See a Problem? Sort order. It can sometimes be a little hard to follow because Matthew is not the most reliable narrator — you sometimes have to figure out for yourself when a particular chapter takes place in the overall timeline of the story, especially the earlier chapters. Adult Fiction. When I opened a bottle of Dr Pepper and the caramel bubbles fizzed over the rim, he was asking me to come out and play.

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