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TAO OF PHOTOGRAPHY PDF

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Tao of Photography book. Read 30 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. This provocative, visually stunning volume draws upon Taoist tea. One might reason that the essence of all photographic art is a spiritual feeling for one's surroundings, but what is most refreshing about these two books is that. Tao of Photography; Seeing Beyond Seeing, we happily introduce LensWork readers to this “first-aid manual for those who yearn to be free of mind-numbing.


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A fun and uplifting book I recently read was "The Tao of Pooh. and especially “ The Tao of Pooh” that I can relate back to street photography. .. reading the “ Tao Tse Ching” which is available readily as a free epub or PDF. Zen/Tao aesthetic principles and photography . The Tao of photography: Can you see all in the one? .. custom-speeches.com~jis//custom-speeches.com Once you've read about the history of nude photography, the many ways you can sharpen. the Czech Pascal Baetens The Art of Photography.

It seems that constant reminders of the theme of the book is the new template and technique of the modern non-fiction.

The Tao of Photography

If you would like to understand the mind and state of a good photographer, this is a very good book. If you expect tips and techniques to take good photographs, this is not a very good book. If you are willing to keep an open mind and be with the book and yourself, you might discover some interesting secrets about the art you love so much.

Oct 13, Scott rated it really liked it. The insights gained come as much from the perspectives shared by the likes of Salgado and Bresson as they do from your own intuitions. It is a delightful read and a splendid interaction when you see its influence in each evolving frame that you capture ever after.

I wouldn't call it great literature by any means, and I cant consider it a functioning text book or manual for thinking and being, however as an interactive psychological tool to unlocking new thought processes and seeing under an emotive and connected context presented with prime examples and glimpses into the minds of great photographers it is something of brilliance.

Thank you Mr Gross. I would have liked to have seen some poetic references and works included rather than mentioned loosely but this is Taoism as it relates to photography. I just see the opportunity to relate a good deal more to Taoism with photography in the foreground. Apr 10, Lance Agena rated it really liked it Recommends it for: This book revealed aspects of photography that are really not covered in any other book I've read on the subject.

I know design and I know illustration, but I didn't get photography. This book helped me to realize that constructing reality through the lens is much the same as designing or illustrating. Much of the parallels the authors mention between "seeing" through photos and "seeing" through life can be applied to much more than photography.

The only criticism I have is that there needs to be This book revealed aspects of photography that are really not covered in any other book I've read on the subject.

The only criticism I have is that there needs to be more photos of the works discussed. I do understand that obtaining rights to publishing some of other artists' works can be impossible sometimes, but it's a shame there's not the examples which are made reference to.

There are however many great inspiring photos from the author, Philippe L. Gross and other great photographers. The book is worth the price just for this. There are also many wonderful quotes and anecdotes of Taoist and photographic masters — good for quick inspiration before heading out with your camera.

Aug 09, Jereme rated it it was ok. The first section on Taoism and the Chuang-tau is wordy, boring and a stretch. Much of the content was said better and far more briefly by Stephen Shore in "The Nature of Photographs. Hey, a collection of wisdom from the masters is great. Just don't market your book as something other than it is. The best part about this book is the photos selected to appear in it.

They are strong samples of the great pho The first section on Taoism and the Chuang-tau is wordy, boring and a stretch. They are strong samples of the great photographers. Jul 29, Tara rated it it was amazing Shelves: Gorgeous photos and thoughtful commentary help envision conscious camera work as mindfulness. Aug 05, Andre rated it liked it. This book is very light on actual techniques that can be used to unconstrict awareness and that's a little disappointing. Regardless This book is very light on actual techniques that can be used to unconstrict awareness and that's a little disappointing.

Regardless, it's nice to know that there is a link, no matter the strength, between learning "the way" and photography.

Mar 06, Jimmy rated it it was amazing. It will give you if anything, the guidelines to break free from the confines of rules that sometimes hinder our ability to see past or through the obvious.

So if you fancy yourself as a bit of a break the rules kind of photographer, then read it you'll never be the same. Jul 07, jimstoic rated it it was amazing Shelves: The best book I've read about making photographs.

It uses Chuang Tzu's early Taoist texts as the starting point for examining how to make photographs and how to live. It includes images by the author and a who's who of twentieth-century photography: Sep 12, Maggie rated it it was ok.

I loved most of the pictures, but it didn't really inspire me or tell me how to be a better photographer really. And some of the pictures really were upheld in the eyes of the beholder because I didn't think some of them were that great. Feb 15, Moni Smith rated it really liked it Shelves: The photography was very inspiring. After reading this book and trying to follow the path of the Taoist sage, I still create images that are just plain dull, and I have to accept this reality as part of the creative process.

But I also create more images that successfully captures the emotion that I felt in the moment. More often now, I find myself thinking of one of my images and saying, "yes, this is the emotional experience that I wanted to preserve and share with others. However if you think about nature—that is simply not true. No matter how hard a fish tries, a fish will never be able to whistle. A tree cannot branch out wings and fly. Similarly, a human cannot expect to out-run a Cheetah unless he is in a car.

Taosim shares that we should know our physical limitations, and not be frustrated by them— and simply accept them. However if you know Winnie the Pooh, you know that Tigger often finds himself in trouble and dangerous situations. I think the way we can apply this way of thinking to street photography is to know who you are. What I mean by that is all of us have different personalities.

Some of us are more outgoing and extroverted, and some of us prefer to keep to ourselves and are more introverted.

They are just two different personality types— neither better nor worse. I know lots of street photographers who are more timid who try to go out and aspire to be like Bruce Gilden and shoot super-close with a flash with a wide-angle lens. For example, I see that most introverted street photographers prefer to keep their distance from their subjects, and not interrupt them. They also tend to focus more on the composition of the scene and spend more time trying to create a more deliberate and purposeful shot.

I think the same goes with more extroverted street photographers. Takeaway point: I advocate that impatient street photographers should cultivate more patience when it comes to their photography.

The Tao of Street Photography

However at the end of the day, I think if your natural state is to move around a lot and not stay around in one spot for a long time— you should realize that and cultivate that part of yourself. If you like to talk with your subjects, interact with them, and even get them to pose for you— know that is what you like and continue working with that. Of course at the end of the day, it is all about a balance—of knowing who you are and also striving to step outside of your own comfort zone.

No longer do we have patience. We want things delivered to us quicker and more efficiently. Think about fast-food. We no longer have the patience of shopping for our own groceries, letting the food defrost, marinating our food, cooking it, and cleaning up afterwards.

We want our food to come out in a matter of minutes, scarf down our food often forgetting to chew or inhale , and then continue to go on our busy lives.

Think about the same thing with books. We no longer have the patience to read novels. Rather, we would prefer to watch the 1.

However Taoism advocates the total opposite. Think of the analogy of a river. It will get to its destination sooner or later.

No matter how much effort we put in, we will drown and always lose. Rather, we should let the river guide us— and take us where we need to go. But nothing is not done. They edited down their images to only their best.

Think about the analogy of a tree. A tree that is over a hundred feet tall often smalls from a seed smaller than a centimeter in length. It has probably taken decades for the tree to grow that tall, slowly, and progressively. With lots of light, water, and nutrients from the ground. Takeaway point: Apply this philosophy to your own street photography.

Rather, it will take decades of hard work, perseverance, and gradual progression.

2. Cherish knowledge over scholarship

The more you photograph, the more comfortable you will get with your camera, focal length, and approach. The more photo books you read like nutrients in the soil you will enrich your visual vocabulary—which will influence the output of your images. The more time you spend time interacting and getting critical feedback from other street photographers, you will be able to prune your weak points and grow stronger think about the gardener that removes weeds from plants.

And with enough positive energy sunlight — you too will grow into being a great street photographer. Enjoy the journey over the destination NYC, We are suckered into thinking that if we work hard enough our entire lives and make huge sacrifices that there is a pot of gold at the end of the rainbow.

However we need to remember, it is always the journey that we enjoy the most— not the ultimate destination.

If we could use Pooh as an example, the anticipation of eating honey is often more enjoyable than the actual act of eating honey. The same can be used when thinking about anything else in life. The anticipation of buying your first car is generally more exciting than once you actually buy the car. The chase of trying to court your first girlfriend or boyfriend is generally more exciting than when you are in a stable relationship.

Trying to get that job and going through the interview process is generally more exciting than once you actually get the job. One of the key things that Taoism advocates is the importance of being aware of the small moments in life— and cherishing them.Drawing mainly from the writings of Chuang-tzu, Gross also quotes freely from Taoist popularizers Suzuki and Watts, and Daniel Goleman.

Click to read more. However if you think about nature—that is simply not true. The Tao of Photography: Seeing Beyond Seeing is a book that may get easily misinterpreted as a book about photography technique. I still remember the exact place and time and circumstance that hurled me onto this photographic road. The only criticism I have is that there needs to be This book revealed aspects of photography that are really not covered in any other book I've read on the subject.

It seems that constant reminders of the theme of the book is the new template and technique of the modern non-fiction. With lots of light, water, and nutrients from the ground.

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